Cozumel Yoga

Yoga in Cozumel: The Importance of Befriending Ourselves by Tammy Cervantes

Cozumel 4 You has become a phenomenon. It occurs to me that what I see on this online forum are many people speaking out. People sharing their opinions on daily topics, but also important issues that impact them. What I think I see in all the banter, the support of one another as a community and in the heated debates that often arise in this arena of personalities is a deep desire for connection.

 

Photo Courtesy of Tammy Cervantes Yoga

Photo Courtesy of Tammy Cervantes Yoga

Practicing  yoga for almost 20 years has been a humbling and enriching experience for me. People tend to think that time brings expertise, and in a multitude of ways it can. What I would really like to share is a process, a progression; not so much of physical feats or any other achievements, but rather an exploration of awareness and the subsequent experience of befriending myself.

 

I’ve heard that we teach what we need to learn, and my first yoga classes were extremely uncomfortable. Yoga challenges us all in different aspects, and many of the physical postures came easy to me. If I hadn’t felt like I was good at it, honestly I probably would have stopped after a couple of classes. I continued to practice but I found it difficult to be present in my body. I realized I couldn’t easily get still, close my eyes and simply pay attention to my physical experience in the moment. I came to yoga with anxiety, and was easily distracted. What I realized after a short time was that I really didn’t know how to just be in my own skin! Meditating on the body and breath wasn’t even possible for me initially,  so I avoided it by being “efficient” at postures.

 

Still, I loved yoga! I became a daily practitioner almost immediately. I spent hours upon hours doing different yoga practices, doing the most challenging poses I could tolerate, really focusing on the physical and being good at the poses. Despite my difficulty being still and paying attention inwardly, I was feeling a renewed energy that I hadn’t felt in years; also a calmness I had possibly never experienced. I also felt physically fit.

 

I spent years studying with the most “prestigious” teachers I could find all over the continent; literally thousands of

Photo Courtesy of Tammy Cervantes Yoga

Photo Courtesy of Tammy Cervantes Yoga

hours of study and training. I have learned many styles and techniques. I read every book on the subject I could get my hands on.  But as I found teachers that really spoke to me, as I sat in meditation, as I worked on myself in a thousand different ways, a repetitive theme continued to emerge. The answer wasn’t more trainings, more information on yoga philosophy or the technicalities of postures. This was not a competition in any way.  Over time, I realized again and again that when we compare ourselves to others, whether we think we are better than or less than, it is impossible to be connected with ourselves fully. When we aren’t connected to ourselves it is impossible to truly connect with others. And if we don’t connect with others, we can’t have real relationships with them. I have continued to show up to yoga in spite of my tendencies toward comparison, competitiveness, inconsistency, feeling less than, resistence and many more blocks. I have practiced right along with them for all these years. Some days they speak louder than others. There is a quote by the Sufi Poet, Rumi, called The Guest House where he encourages us to invite and welcome in even our enemies. This metaphor speaks to what I now believe in my heart, which is that in order for me to be the whole, integrated human being I want to be, it is indispensable to acknowledge, accept and honor ALL parts of myself,  even –  and especially those that I don’t like. This I call befriending myself. What I realize,  sometimes painfully slowly is something I heard from a great teacher years ago: that this grasping to always improve is a subtle form of aggression towards one’s self. When I just allow me to be me, I realize that although I’m not remotely close to perfect, I am enough!

 

Here are some ways that I presently practice befriending myself:

 

  • I try to talk to myself like I would my best friend; someone I care for deeply. It is a process to stop saying things like “I’m so stupid!”, comparing myself to others or beating myself up in other ways for making mistakes. Today, when I make a mistake I try to remember, and tell myself I’m human, I make mistakes. And let it go.
  • I spend time in nature. Cozumel is a lovely place, with gorgeous scenery and weather! Going for a walk in nature is easy. I live a block from the ocean! Or simply floating in the ocean feels very nurturing to me.
  • I do some sort of physical exercise every day. Whether that is just a few minutes of gentle yoga poses, a walk or going to the gym. I try to move my body in different ways daily.
  • As I have matured, my yoga practice has matured. When I come to my mat or my meditation cushion, I practice not wanting, and not not wanting. In other words, I set an intention of no expectations before I begin. That could be in the form a simple statement (mantra), like “I will do my best, and let my best be good enough”, or say a little prayer,  asking to be guided to do my practice instead of trying to achieve something. I have days that I establish I will be physically challenging to myself,  others where I decide I am going to do only the poses I love most. Either way, these days I try to consciously come to my mat with an intent of being nice to myself. I do this imperfectly,  and I know when I’m distracted,  when I have begun to check out,  because I find myself powering through. In seated meditation, I know that I’m trying too hard because I hold my breath,  which causes tension in my body. I tell students often that it doesn’t really matter so much what they’re doing on the mat. If they’re breathing and paying attention to that,  they’re practicing yoga. I I remind myself of this repeatedly.

 

  • I try to feed my body nourishing, whole, live foods at regular times during the day and listen when my body says it’s hungry, or when it is full.

 

 

Through learning to be more and more present in my own life and being nicer to myself, I have also become more attuned to students and I have a better sense of how to meet them where they are; not leading the class from a preconceived plan. Rather, I look at their bodies, connect with them and teach from a place of relating to their experience in the moment.

 

I have been blessed to have crossed paths with hundreds of people who have engaged in conversation with me about yoga. Many of these are confused about what it is, or have walked blindly into a class that was not appropriate for them and therefore think that yoga is not for them. Paraphrasing the most respected yoga teacher in the last century,  there are many yogas. There are many different practices within yoga. There are many styles of yoga. Many diverse meditation techniques, breathing exercises, physical postures, chant…… are all different yoga practices. Some people focus mostly on one of these, and others a little of many of them. Some of the Asana or physical posture practices are quite effortless, and others are quite vigorous. I tell students often that if you ask 10 yoga teachers a question you may very well get 10 different answers. I’m not here to disprove any of them. If yoga is connection, then it is important to feel some sort of connection, or “click” with the person or persons teaching you.

 

If you are one of those people that are curious about yoga,  but “don’t want to look like a fool”,  or “can’t do it because I’m not flexible”, “it’s too challenging” or think that it is a religion I invite you to give it a chance. Shop around for physically appropriate classes and ones that you can relate to. For me it is important to remember that most new things that I try are uncomfortable in the beginning in some way. The unknown is uncomfortable. But giving yoga a chance, being willing to be uncomfortable at times has opened up my world in profound ways. This examination of myself is slowly teaching me to befriend myself. To connect with myself,  in order to connect with others and have better relationships. In the process of going upside down, sitting in silence for hours, and yes, sometimes even twisting my body into pretzel, I’m learning better Living skills.

 

Tammy Cervantes Yoga offers the following classes and more, for different abilities and age groups, both group classes and privates:

 

Beginner and all level Vinyasa

Gentle Mindfulness Yoga

50+ (slow, accessible postures with different meditation techniques that are conducive to longevity)

Beginner Mindfulness Meditation

Restorative yoga

Yoga For Recovery From Addictions

 

Find her at Tammy Cervantes Yoga on facebook, tammycervantes@gmail.com or call her at 9875643200 for more information on classes. The new site, tammycervantesyoga.com will launch very soon!

Yoga en Cozumel: La importancia de ser nuestros propios amigos, por Tammy Cervantes

Photo Courtesy of Tammy Cervantes Yoga

Photo Courtesy of Tammy Cervantes Yoga

Cozumel 4 You se ha convertido en un fenómeno. Considero que en este foro en línea observo a muchas personas pronunciándose públicamente; que estas personas que comparten sus opiniones acerca de temas cotidianos, también lo hacen respecto a asuntos que les impactan. Lo que creo ver en estas charlas es apoyo de unos a los otros como comunidad, y en los acalorados debates que frecuentemente surgen en este ámbito de personalidades, hay un profundo deseo de establecer un nexo.

 

Practicar yoga durante casi 20 años para mi ha sido una experiencia de humildad y enriquecedora. La gente tiende a pensar que con el tiempo se logra la habilidad, y ello puede suceder de muchas formas distintas. Lo que verdaderamente me gustaría compartir es un proceso, un avance, no tanto por los logros físicos o cualesquiera otros, sino por la exploración de la conciencia y la posterior experiencia de convertirme en mi propia amiga.

 

He escuchado que solemos enseñar aquello que necesitamos aprender, y mis primeras clases de yoga fueron sumamente incómodas. Yoga es un reto para nosotros en distintos aspectos, y muchas de las posturas físicas me eran fáciles. Si no hubiera sentido que lo hacía bien, con toda franqueza es muy posible sólo hubiera impartido un par de clases más. Continúe practicando, pero tenía dificultad para estar presente en mi cuerpo. Me percaté que no me era fácil estar quieta, cerrar los ojos y simplemente prestar atención a la experiencia fisca del momento. Me aproximaba a la práctica del yoga con ansiedad y me distraía fácilmente. ¡En poco tiempo me di cuenta que realmente no sabía estar en mi propia piel! Al principio, ni siquiera me era posible meditar acerca de mi cuerpo y de la respiración … así que lo evitaba haciendo posturas “eficientes”.

 

Sin embargo, ¡me encantaba el yoga! Casi de inmediato me convertí en una practicante cotidiana. Pasaba horas y horas realizado prácticas distintas de yoga, haciendo las posturas más difíciles que pudiera tolerar, verdaderamente concentrándome en lo físico y siendo buena con las posturas. No obstante la dificultad que tenía para estar quieta y poner atención a mi interior, sentía una energía renovada que no había sentido en años, y una calma que es muy posiblemente nunca había tenido. También sentía estar en muy buena forma.

 

Durante años estudié con los maestros más “prestigiados” que pudiera encontrar en el continente; literalmente pasé miles de horas estudiando y capacitándome. He aprendido muchos estilos y técnicas. He leído todo libro que llegara a mis manos sobre el tema. Pero conforme encontraba maestros que verdaderamente me hablaran, conforme meditaba, conforme trabajaba en mi misma en miles de maneras, había un tema que recurrentemente surgía. La respuesta no era mayor cantidad de capacitación, mayor información sobre la filosofía yoga o las partes técnicas de las posturas. De ninguna forma era una competencia.  Con el paso del tiempo me di cuenta una y otra vez, que cuando nos comparamos con otras personas, ya sea que tengamos la creencia de ser mejor que otros o inferiores, ello hará que sea imposible conectarnos totalmente con nosotros mismos.  Cuando no tenemos esa conexión con nosotros mismos es imposible hacer el nexo con otros;  y si no hacemos conexión con otros, no es posible mantener una relación con ellos.  Continuamente me presento a yoga a pesar de las tendencias que tengo de comparar, de competir, de ser inconsistente, de sentirme inferior , la resistencia y muchos otros bloqueos. He practicado junto a estos sentimientos durante todos estos años. Hay días donde éstos hablan más fuerte que otros. En una cita de Rumi, el poeta sufí, llamada La Casa de los Huéspedes nos alienta a invitar y dar la bienvenida incluso a nuestros enemigos. Esta metáfora habla sobre lo que ahora creo de corazón, que para que me sea posible existir como el ser humano total y pleno que deseo ser, es indispensable reconocer, aceptar y honrar TODAS las partes de mi ser, incluso-y especialmente- aquellas que no me agradan. Esto es lo que yo llamo convertirme en mi propia amiga.  Lo que he comprendido, en ocasiones con penosa lentitud, es algo que escucho de un gran maestro hace muchos años: aferrarnos a siempre querer ser mejores, es una sutil forma de agresión contra uno mismo.  Cuando sólo me permito ser yo misma, me percato que a pesar de no estar ni remotamente cerca de la perfección, ¡soy bastante!

 

Aquí  comparto algunas de las maneras que actualmente practico para ser mi propia amiga:

  • Procuro platicarme de la misma manera que lo haría con mi mejor amiga, alguien que me importa profundamente. Es un proceso para dejar de decir cosas como “¡Soy tan estúpido!”, compararme con otros o castigándome de otras maneras por cometer errores. Hoy en día, cuando cometo un error trato de recordar esto diciéndome que soy humana y que cometo errores; y lo dejo ir.
  • Paso tiempo en la naturaleza. Cozumel es un lugar hermoso, con paisajes y clima esplendidos. Salir a caminar entre la naturaleza es fácil. ¡Vivo a una cuadra de distancia del mar! O sencillamente flotar en el mar me estimula.
  • Todos los días hago algún tipo de ejercicio físico. Ya sean sólo unos minutos de posturas suaves de yoga, una caminata al gimnasio. Todos los días procuro mover mi cuerpo en formas distintas.
  • Conforme he madurado, también ha madurado mi práctica de yoga. Cuando llego a mi tapete o a mi cojín para meditar, practico no querer y el no no querer. En otras palabras, determino la intención de no tener expectativas antes de comenzar. Esto podría ser a través de una sencilla declaración (mantra) como por ejemplo, “voy a hacer lo mejor que me sea posible y dejar que lo mejor de mi sea suficiente”, o digo una pequeña oración pidiendo ser guiada para hacer mi práctica en vez de tratar de lograr algo. Hay días que determino que me retaré físicamente; otros, decido sólo hacer las ones que me gustan más. De cualquier manera, esos días procuro llegar de manera consciente a mi tapete con la intención de ser amable conmigo misma. Esto lo hago en forma imperfecta, y se cuando estoy distraída, cuando he comenzado a  comprobar algo, ya que estoy incrementado la potencia. En una meditación sedente, se que me estoy esforzando demasiado pues detengo la respiración causando tensión a mi cuerpo. Con frecuencia digo a mis estudiantes que en realidad no tiene mucha importancia lo que hagan en el tapete. Si realmente están respirando y poniendo atención a ello, entonces están practicando yoga. Esto es algo que constantemente me repito a mi misma.
  • Trato de alimentar a mi cuerpo con alimentos enteros y vivos, en horas regulares durante el día y escucho a mi cuerpo cuando este dice que tiene hambre o que está satisfecho.

Aprendiendo a estar más y más presente en mi propia vida y ser más amable conmigo misma,  me he armonizado más con mis estudiantes, teniendo una ,mejor idea de cómo encontrarlos en el sitio donde están en lugar de guiar la clase desde un plan preconcebido.  Mas bien, veo sus cuerpos, me conecto con ellos y los instruyo desde un sitio que se relaciona con su experiencia en el momento.

 

He sido bendecida al cruzarme en el camino de cientos de personas que comienzan a platicar conmigo sobre yoga. Muchas de estas personas están confusas respecto a lo que es o han entrado ciegamente a una clase que no era la adecuada para ellas y, por lo tanto, creen que el yoga no es para ellas. Parafraseando al maestro de yoga más respetado en el ultimo siglo: existen muchos yogas. Hay muchas prácticas de yoga dentro del yoga. Muchas técnicas distintas de meditación, ejercicios de respiración, posturas físicas, cantos … todas son prácticas distintas de yoga. Hay personas que se centran más en alguna de estas; otras hacen un poco de todas. Algunas de las prácticas de posturas Asana son sencillas, y otras bastante intensas. Con frecuencia digo a los estudiantes que si hacen una pregunta a 10 profesores distintos de yoga es muy posible que obtengan 10 respuestas diferentes. No desapruebo a nadie. Si yoga es la conexión, entonces es importante sentir algún tipo de conexión o hacer “clic” con la persona o personas que les imparten la enseñanza.

 

Si usted es la clase de persona que siente curiosidad por el yoga pero “no quiero verme como un tonto”, o “no lo puedo practicar por que no tengo flexibilidad”, o “es demasiado desafiante” o creen que es una religión, le invito a que le de una oportunidad. Verifique las clases que le sean físicamente adecuadas y aquellas que le interesen. Para mi es importante recordar que la gran mayoría de las cosas nuevas que trato de hacer, en cierta forma son incómodas al principio. Lo desconocido es incómodo.  Al dar una oportunidad al yoga y tener la voluntad de sentirme incomoda en ciertos momentos me abrió el mundo en un sentido muy profundo. Este análisis de mi misma lentamente me enseña a ser  mi propia amiga; a conectarme conmigo misma para poder conectarme con otros y tener mejores relaciones. En el proceso de estar de cabeza, de sentarme en silencio durante horas y, sí, en ocasiones haciendo de mi cuerpo una rosca, aprendo a tener mejores habilidades para Vivir.

 

Tammy Cervantes Yoga ofrece las siguientes clases y más, para diferentes habilidades y edades, tanto en clases de grupo como privadas:

 

Principiante y multinivel Vinyasa

Yoga de Plena Conciencia

50 y mayores (posturas lentas y accesibles con diferentes técnicas de meditación que  propician la longevidad)

Meditación de Plena Conciencia para Principiante

Yoga reconstituyente

Yoga para la recuperación de adicciones

 

Encuentren a Tammy Cervantes Yoga en facebook, escriban a tammycervantes@gmail.com o comuníquense con ella llamando al 9875643200 para obtener mayor información acerca de las clases. ¡Muy pronto  estará el nuevo sitio tammycervantesyoga.com!

Tammy Cervantes

Tammy Cervantes is one of the pioneers of yoga in Cozumel, Mexico.With over 15 years’ experience teaching, and her fluency in the Spanish language she has taught in diverse venues and communities both in the U.S. and Mexico. Her students have included professional athletes, performance artists, the physically and mentally challenged, and she has especially enjoyed giving back to the community by making classes available to people who might otherwise not be able to participate. She is especially committed to her work with people in recovery from addictions, and has been blessed in assisting in the organization of the Yoga + Meditation For Recovery Conference at Esalen Institute for 5 years. She delights in offering yoga teacher trainings, and leading a vast array of retreats and workshops. Tammy's teaching is inspired by her deep desire to assist others in cultivating present-moment awareness: she leads by living the principles of facing life bravely, by acknowledging, honoring and integrating our experiences both joyful and painful. Tammy believes that sharing this with others is her most challenging, courageous and meaningful work in life.

Latest posts by Tammy Cervantes (see all)

0 Comments

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

©2019 Cozumel 4 You  |  Website Design by Internet Marketing Press

Log in with your credentials

Forgot your details?

Skip to toolbar