Guidelines for Drone Etiquette in Cozumel

Marty & Robin Chacon outline polite ways to use your drone

 

Photo Courtesy of Cozumel Living the Dream

You’re visiting Cozumel and you want to bring your drone.  You and your drone are welcome here and we encourage you to review these etiquette guidelines while on our island.

 

Emily Post wrote: “Etiquette must, if it is to be of more than trifling use, include ethics as well as manners.”

 

These etiquette guidelines will ensure you don’t become just another asshole with a drone.

  • Don’t drink and drone! You are piloting an unmanned aircraft and with that comes responsibility.  Do that free tequila tasting after you’ve run out of battery power.  There are plenty of hours in the day to punish your liver on vacation.
  • Ask permission before flying over private property. The homeowner is likely to think you are a freak and you may go home without your drone.  If you wouldn’t like someone visiting your neighborhood and flying their drone in your backyard, don’t do it here.
  • Peeping drones are creepy. Never fly your drone close to windows of hotels, condos, homes, etc.  It is a violation of privacy.  Don’t do it!
  • Do not fly close to disasters. You may unknowingly keep emergency personnel from doing their jobs. If you think your drone can help, ask the appropriate personnel for permission and then respect their decision.
  • Ask event organizers in advance if you can drone their event. They may not want the buzz of your drone or they may have hired a professional already.
  • Avoid flying over crowds of people. There is always that chance that your drone could fail mechanically and someone could be injured.
  • Understand the mechanics of your drone and practice before bringing it on vacation.
  • Do not fly close to unbeknownst strangers. They may not take kindly to having a noisy robot buzzing above their head as they go about their business. If you have a legitimate need to film in that location, make appropriate notification of the purpose of your video.
  • Don’t fly near the airport. Cozumel is a small island with a combined commercial and military airport. There are apps such as Airmap that will help you identify the no-fly zones. There are some consumer drones, such as DJI, that include software preventing flying in no-fly zones.  Special permission from the airport tower must be obtained if you have a legitimate reason to fly your drone in these restricted zones.
  • Check online for active NOTAMs (Notice to Airmen) for any temporary no fly zones.
  • Keep children, animals, and clueless humans away when taking off and landing your drone. No one wants to see anyone get hurt.
  • Do not chase or hassle wildlife with your drone. They can, and they just might, take it out on your drone.
  • If someone enquires about your drone be courteous and helpful. Be a good drone ambassador and explain what you’re doing.  Talk to them about the good things that drones can do (like disaster mapping and search and rescue, marketing for tourist destinations such as Cozumel, etc.).  Answer their concerns about privacy, show them your screen so they can see what the drone is capturing.  Let them see that you are not some psycho zooming in on the bikini clad women on the beach. Let them know if it is not safe to speak to them just yet.
  • Avoid disturbing the peace. Cozumel is a beautiful place and you want to capture it with your drone.  Be courteous if there are others around enjoying some peace and quiet.  Use your drone when others’ peace will not be disturbed or ask first.
  • Do not fly above the 400 feet ceiling limit – when outside of the airport no-fly zone, 400 feet will keep you below the airport flight path.
  • Stay off your phone while you drone. Social media, text, WhatsApp, and the old-fashioned phone call can wait until you’ve landed your drone.  Turn off alerts and banners if you use your phone to pilot your drone.  Keep in mind that cell phones can interfere with a drone’s operations. Drone pilots that use a drone controller with a lower GHz, similar to that of a cell phone, should put any extra phones in airplane mode.  This includes your friends that wish to be nearby while you control your drone.
  • Are there any risks with your flight plan? Do you have a flight plan?  If the answer to the latter is no, then don’t drone.  Decide on a flight plan first and then assess the risks.  If there is a risk to you, other humans or animals, or your equipment, do not drone.
  • Are there people within the vicinity of your takeoff and landing position? Do they look freaked out?  Talk to them first so they don’t think you’re some creep about to violate their privacy.
  • Don’t lose sight of your drone! If you have your eyes on the controller and are not familiar with your surroundings, have a friend keep sight of the drone.

If we want to secure this technology for the future, exercise caution.  If it wouldn’t feel right at home, don’t drone it here.  Just because you’re on vacation doesn’t mean tossing etiquette and manners aside for the duration.  You’re visiting but there are real people that live here.

The official Mexican Government website regulating drones is located here.  Review this before your trip each time you visit just in case the rules have changed.  If you don’t understand Spanish, use your computer’s translation feature in the settings, Google translate, or phone a friend.

This website, TheDroneInfo.com, is written in English and provides drone regulations for the countries that have them.

So you’re here with your drone and you’re up on the etiquette and the concerns of Cozumeleños and its visitors.

 

Yay!  Have fun and be creative with your vacation video.  And don’t forget to share it with us on Cozumel 4 You’s Facebook page!

 

These articles contributed to this one and are good resources for further reading.

http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2016/05/an_etiquette_guide_to_operating_a_drone.html

http://www.dronepilotsfederation.org/civilian-drone-ettiquette/

http://www.doddlenews.com/news-room/drones-101-drone-etiquette/

http://dronelife.com/2015/07/08/the-7-deadly-sins-of-flying-a-drone/

 

Marty and Robin Chacon are the owner operators of Cozumel Living the Dream Drone Photography and Videography.  Marty is an experienced drone pilot with hundreds of drone hours flown and is active with a drone community of enthusiasts and experts.  He flies regularly and remains updated on everything drone.  Robin is an action still photographer and ground videographer. If you have specific questions regarding the use of your drone while on Cozumel please do not hesitate to contact us.  We will do our best to assist you with a fun and safe drone experience on Cozumel.  We can also arrange to drone your special moment.  Contact us at www.cozumellivingthedream.com.

 

Pautas de etiqueta al usar drones en Cozumel

Marty y Robin Chacon describen las formas correctas para el uso de drones

Usted está de visita en Cozumel y quiere traer su dron. Usted y su dron son bienvenido y le recomendamos que lea las siguientes pautas de etiqueta.

 

Emily Post escribió: “Si es para  algo más que insignificante, la etiqueta debe abarcar tanto ética como modales”.

 

Estas pautas de etiqueta garantizaran que usted no se convierta en tan solo otro idiota más con un dron.

Photo Courtesy of Cozumel Living the Dream

  • ¡No ingiera bebidas alcohólicas a la vez que usa un dron! Usted esta pilotando una nave no tripulada y ello conlleva una responsabilidad. Haga la degustación gratuita después de que el dron se quedó sin batería. El día tiene muchas horas para que castiga a su hígado mientras se encuentra de vacaciones.
  • Solicite autorización antes de sobrevolar una propiedad privada. Es posible que el propietario le considere que está trastornado y no regrese a casa con su dron. Si no le agrada la idea que alguien visite su vecindario volando un dron dentro de su patio trasero, entonces no lo haga aquí.
  • Los drones que fisgonean son espantosos. Nunca vuele el dron cerca de ventanas de hoteles, de edificios en condominio, de residencias, etc. Es una violación a la privacidad. ¡No lo hagan!
  • No vuelen cerca de un área donde haya ocurrido un desastre. Sin darse cuenta podría obstaculizar la labor del personal de emergencia. Si considera que el dron puede ayudar, pida permiso al personal correspondiente y respete la decisión que tomen.
  • Con anticipación pregunte a los organizadores de un evento si acaso le permiten usar el dron durante el mismo. Tal vez no desee que se escuche el zumbido de su dron o que ellos ya hayan contratado a un profesional.
  • Evite volar sobre multitudes. Siempre existe la posibilidad que falle mecánicamente el dron y alguien salga lastimado.
  • Conozca los aspectos mecánicos de su dron y practique antes de traerlo a sus vacaciones.
  • No vuele cerca de desconocidos. Es posible que no acepten fácilmente que un robot esté zumbando sobre sus cabezas mientras ellos están ocupados con sus propias actividades. Si usted tiene una razón real para filmar ese sitio, primero de aviso del objetivo de su video.
  • No vuele cerca del aeropuerto. Cozumel es una Isla pequeña que cuenta con un solo aeropuerto militar y comercial a la vez. Existes aplicaciones tales como Airmap que le ayudarán a identificar los espacios aéreos restringidos. Algunos usuarios cuentan con drones tales como DJI que incluyen programas que evitan el vuelo en zonas de exclusión. Si usted tiene un motivo legítimo para volar en esas zonas restringidas, es necesario obtener autorización especial por parte de la torre del aeropuerto.
  • Para las zonas de restricción temporal de vuelo, verifique en línea si se han expedido NOTAMs (Avisos a Aviadores).
  • Al despegar y aterrizar su dron, mantenga alejados a los niños, animales así como a los despistados. Nadie quiere ver que otros se lastimen.
  • No persiga ni moleste a la fauna silvestre con su dron. Pueden desquitarse con su dron, y es posible que lo hagan.
  • Si alguien le hace preguntas acerca de su dron, sea amable y atento. Sea un buen embajador de los drones y explique lo que está haciendo. Platique con las personas acerca de las cosas buenas que los drones pueden hacer (tales como mapas en los desastres, búsqueda y rescate; comercializar destinos turísticos como Cozumel, etc.). Conteste sus dudas acerca de la privacidad; muéstreles su pantalla para que puedan ver lo que el dron está tomando. Permítales ver que no es un psicópata tomando acercamientos de mujeres en bikini que se encuentran en la playa. Hágales saber que por el momento no es seguro platicar con usted.
  • Evite perturbar la paz. Cozumel es un sitio bello y usted quiere hacer tomas con su dron. Sea amable si hay otras personas que disfrutan de la paz y tranquilidad. Use su dron cuando no moleste la paz de otros, o pregunte primero.
  • No vuele arriba del limite de 400 pies cuando se encuentre en la zona de exclusión del aeropuerto. Los 400 pies le mantendrán por debajo de la trayectoria de vuelos del aeropuerto.
  • No conteste su teléfono cuando usa el dron. Los medios sociales, los textos, los mensajes de WhatsApp y el teléfono al viejo estilo pueden esperar hasta que usted haya aterrizado el dron. Si usa su teléfono para pilotar el dron, apague las alertas y los anuncios. Tenga en mente que los teléfonos celulares pueden interferir las operaciones del dron. Los pilotos de dron que usan un controlador con GHz menor y similar al de un teléfono celular, deben colocar teléfonos adicionales en el modo aeronave. Ello incluye a sus amigos que desean estar cerca cuando usted controla el dron.
  • ¿Su plan de vuelo presenta algún riesgo? ¿Cuenta con un plan de vuelo? Si la respuesta a la segunda pregunta es no, entonces no use un dron. Primero decida cuál es el plan de vuelo y luego valore los riesgos. Si hay riesgo para usted, para otras personas o animales, o a su equipo, mejor no use el dron.
  • ¿Hay personas cerca de área de despegue y aterrizaje? ¿Se ven asustadas? Platique primero con ellas para que no crean que usted es un cretino que está a punto de violar la privacidad de esas personas.

 

Si deseamos garantizar esta tecnología para el futuro, hay que actuar con prudencia. Si no siente que está bien, no use su dron aquí. Sólo porque se encuentra de vacaciones no significa que durante el tiempo de su estancia descartará la etiqueta y la educación.  Usted se encuentra de visita, pero hay personas que viven aquí.

 

El sitio web del gobierno mexicano regulador para drones se encuentra aqui.  Cada ocasión que venga de visita, lea esto para verificar si las reglas han cambiado. Si no entiende español, utilice la función de traducción en la configuración de su computadora, traduzca por medio de Google, teléfono  alguna amistad.  Este sitio web  The Drone Info.com está en inglés y  aparecen normas de otros países respecto a los drones.

Así que, se encuentra usted aquí y ya está informado acerca de la etiqueta y lo que  concierne a los cozumeleños y visitantes.

 

¡Hurra!  Diviértase y sea creativo con el video que tome de sus vacaciones; ¡y no  olvide compartirlo con nosotros en la página de Cozumel 4 You en Facebook!

 

Los siguientes artículos que presentamos, aportaron información para este y son buenas fuentes de información adicional.

http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2016/05/an_etiquette_guide_to_operating_a_drone.html

http://www.dronepilotsfederation.org/civilian-drone-ettiquette/

http://www.doddlenews.com/news-room/drones-101-drone-etiquette/

http://dronelife.com/2015/07/08/the-7-deadly-sins-of-flying-a-drone/

 

Marty y Robin Chacón son propietarios operadores de Fotografía y Videografía Cozumel Living the Dream Drone.  Marty cuenta con cientos de horas de experiencia pilotando drones y se mantiene activo en la comunidad de fanáticos y expertos  en drones.  Vuela con frecuencia y se mantiene al día con todo lo relacionado con los drones. Robin se dedica a fotos fijas de acciones y a la videografía en tierra. Si usted tiene preguntas específicas respecto al uso de su dron en Cozumel, por favor no dude en ponerse en contacto con nosotros. Haremos todo lo posible para ayudarle a que su experiencia con el dron en Cozumel sea segura y divertida. También podeos hacer  arreglos con el dron para algún momento especial. Pónganse en contacto con nosotros a través de www.cozumellivingthedream.com.

 

Laura Wilkinson

Author at Cozumel 4 You
Laura Wilkinson is the Editor for Cozumel 4 You. An ex-Connecticut Yankee who has called Cozumel home for over 15 years, Laura ran away to the Caribbean years ago, bumped around the islands teaching SCUBA diving, lost some time in Jamaica, and finally stopped in Cozumel for a 2 week vacation that hasn’t ended yet. With a degree in Journalism from a fancy private college she convinced her parents to pay for, Laura writes, edits, and creates the weekly Cozumel 4 You news, promotional articles about the island, and her very own blog, which she finds hilarious. Her long suffering husband, the Fabster, has long since resigned himself to having zero private life, as he’s been involved in her various schemes and plots since his arrival. Proud parents to a variety of rescue dogs and cats, Laura continues to be the bane of her traditional Mexican mother-in-law’s existence, as she muses her way through life in the Mexican Caribbean.

Latest posts by Laura Wilkinson (see all)

0 Comments

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

©2017 Cozumel 4 You  |  Website Design by Internet Marketing Press

Log in with your credentials

Forgot your details?

Skip to toolbar